Yet another curated TED Talk, too inspiring not to be blogged about. Erik Brynjolfsson is co-author of Race Against The Machine, an essay he wrote together with his MIT Sloan School of Management fellow professor Andrew “Enterprise 2.0″ McAfee. Professor McAfee, who also made an excellent TED talk on this topic, is a very well known figure on #hypertextual ([humblebrag] I even managed to shake his hand and to thank him in a quite clumsy way during Boston E20 Conference in 2011 [/humblebrag]).

What impressed me the most in this talk is the smooth and easy way the speaker brings ground breaking ideas. The bottom line : the automatisation of everything is taking jobs away from workers, and this shall include even knowledge workers. As a result we are living in a time of exponential changes (an idea I first heard in 2011 USI talk from Ray Kurzweil) but we are wired for linear changes. We therefore need to transform the way we work and move towards more team work and take advantage of big data to move towards more scientific approach.

Here are some transcripts of this brilliant talk.

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The bad news is ignoring the work of people is almost as bad as shredding the result of their work in front of their eyes. The good news is simply looking at what somebody has done and scanning it and say “aha” that seems quite sufficient to dramatically improve people’s motivation.

Dan Ariely is an Israeli American professor of psychology and behavioral economics. He teaches at Duke University and is the founder of The Center for Advanced Hindsight. He describes in this TED talks some experiments that have been carried out to investigate the inner mechanics of personal motivation. Thanks to Vincent Ehrhart for sharing this.

Je suis plutôt fan de TED (le site, hein pas le film que je n’ai pas vu). Je n’ai jamais participé à une conférence TED (assez cher me suis-je laissé dire) ou TEDx (malgré l’excellente initiative de l’équipe TEDx Bordeaux).

Ce que je trouve remarquable c’est comment TED rend la connaissance accessible et sexy grâce à quatre éléments essentiels : le format, l’humour, la diffusion et la qualité. La connaissance en objets pop, TED l’a fait et voici comment … Read the rest of this entry »

I am a big fan of Gary Hamel. His pyramid of human capabilities is one of the best clicker of this blog. The Future Of Management probably is one of the most inspirational book I’ve ever read about management.

This is an exhilarating talk Professor Hamel gave to the university of Phoenix. As if that was not enough, check out the format of the animation behind him. I suppose (actually I hope) this has been done afterwards. But the result is breathtaking. Read the rest of this entry »

This is a awesome talk by Sherry Turkle. Turkle is a professor in the Program in Science, Technology and Society at MIT and the founder and director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self.

She is the author Alone Together : Why we expect more from technology and less from each other and this talk introduces the book.

The pitch here : mobile and social take us away from real time conversation. It helps us setting enough distance with each others so that we can control conversation while editing our texting, posts, emails. We can therefore control the image we present about ourselves. As such, these tools not only change the way we do but they also change the way we are.

Profound and powerful it is strongly recommended. I recognized myself in some of the examples and I’m sure you also will. The second part (as of 09:30mns) is scary in how people wish devices could become more human.

A question to my Social Business Activists friends : how do we deal with this on a personal level and on an enterprise one ?

Some transcripts one click away. Read the rest of this entry »

The Myths of Innovation

February 12, 2011

In the knowledge economy, Innovation represents the Holy Grail : the undisputed source of wealth, pride and prestige. It is one of the most respected and worshiped word in corporate vocabulary. Yet you can hardly find organisations that share a same definition, let alone have a clear plan to manage it. The reason is : we are misguided by common misconception that run rampant in business and popular culture (Berkun).

With The Myths of innovation, his second book, Scott Berkun aims to clarify the topic : he is merciless with wishful thinking using his ruthless wit and encyclopaedic culture on the subject.

This paperback re-edition is a revised version of the original 2007 edition including four new (and amazing) chapters. As usual with Scott, this is a fantastic read, filled with conviction, great ideas, provocative thoughts, common sense and unexpected bursts of humour. The telling stories, the usability of the advises, the hindsight and wisdom of conclusions and the Occam Razor approach of Scott brings bucket loads of value to the reader.

You want to know how to make innovation happen ? And, more importantly, what prevents it from happening because of cultural beliefs and urban legends ? Read on …

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(Version française)

As for the second time in recent history of Apple, Steve Jobs steps down from the board for health reasons, #hypertextual honors the man Fortune has voted the best CEO of the decade 00.

Billionaire and a leading figure in 4 industries, His Steveness, as his afficionados nicknamed him, enjoys a unique status as a tech business icon today.

This post as an attempt to understand how SJ became such an iconic figure of the 21st century and to find an equivalent in history (note : there is a hint in the title) ….

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